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Since the inception of the World Wide Web, data centers and hosting providers have been utilized by developers to build and publish experiences that have changed how each and every one of us experience daily life. Like any technology, the way we have distributed data over the past decade has changed, for reasons ranging from performance and security, to concerns surrounding data control, along with the recent uprising of cancel culture. Lately, hosting providers like Amazon’s AWS, Google Cloud and others have been taking websites and web apps offline that don’t exactly reflect their corporate values. To add to this…


Now that you have seen all that dWeb 3.0 has to offer, it’s time to start playing around and creating dWeb-based services. The all-new dWeb CLI makes all this possible. dWeb’s CLI handles the entire dHub daemon installation process for you, so that you can focus on development and publishing dWeb-based experiences without any complexities. To install dWeb CLI and startup the dHub daemon in the background, do the following:

```

npm install @dhub/cli -g

dweb daemon start

```

- Then check the daemon status like so:

```

dweb daemon status

```

If everything is running smoothly, the fun can…


For computers across the world to exchange data on a peer-to-peer basis, there needed to be a software that could operate on personal computers, capable of creating, managing and seeding dDatabase-based abstractions, whether it was raw dDatabases (distributed append-only logs), dTries (distributed trie-based key-value stores), dTrees (distributed binary trees) or dDrives (distributed file systems). In my previous post about the Local Layer, I introduced a new companion library for dDatabase 10.0 known as Basestore, which allowed for the interlinking of dDatabases, even by specific “namespaces.” It does not matter what a dDatabase contains, whether its a dDrive or a dTree…


As described in the previous post, dSwarm’s DHT can be used to announce and lookup dWeb network addresses or for connecting with peers that announce themselves under previously announced network addresses. Once connected, peers can truly exchange anything, whether its a message or some other data structure. dWeb 3.0 features many new tools that showcase dWeb’s ability to power everything from voice calling to SSH connections. Below, we will explore many newcomers in dWeb’s 3.0 toolkit.

==== DCAST & THE E2E ENCRYPTED INTERNET PIPE

The all-new `dcast` module allows two peers to exchange encrypted messages over a dWeb network address-based…


Like dDrive, dSwarm (formerly known as dWebSwarm) has been around since the inception of the dWeb but has improved greatly over the last two versions. Initially, dWeb network addresses were stored on a centralized DNS server but in dWeb 2.0, network addresses were moved to dSwarm’s own Kademilia DHT, where today, peer discovery on the dWeb is completely decentralized. With the rollout of dWeb 3.0, there are several new tools and libraries that have greatly improved the processes surrounding dWeb network address announcement, peer discovery and more. There are even tools for you to launch your own dWeb!

==== THE…


In the previous two posts, we outlined the all-new dMesh Graph-based DHT and Authenticator DHTs, as well as DHT-based bridging and validation. These new features in the dWeb 3.0 rollout provide a multi-writer distributed database and an authentication framework that can be utilized by applications who want to move beyond the blockchain for data storage and user authentication. This key networking layer of the dWeb is known as the “Remote” layer, although, the dWeb is ultimately made up of four layers: Application, Remote, Local and Storage (). …


Since the inception of the dWeb, we have been able to distribute and access file systems amongst a group of peers efficiently, which is what you do every single day within dBrowser (http://dbrowser.com) when you type in a dWeb network address and view a website. While this was amazing three years ago when we first started this project, this is something you see with many other projects like IPFS, Hypercore, GunDb and a handful of others like Ethereum’s Swarm. Although, the dWeb’s Storage Layer is still one of the most important layers in the dWeb ecosystem, considering it’s how we…


Since the launch of Bitcoin more than 10 years ago, there has been growing interest in and around the concept of decentralized and distributed computing platforms (DCPs). Much of this interest has focused on the development of novel digital currencies, commonly referred to as “cryptocurrencies.” Many of these cryptocurrencies, including Bitcoin and the popular Ethereum, make use of cryptographic ledgers to verify and reconcile transactions between participants. These ledgers, known as blockchains, are maintained, and operated by independent networks of computers. The actions of these networks are largely automated, spelled-out in vast collections of computer code authored by the project’s…


Yesterday, we kicked off the Let Freedom Stream (LFS) series where I described dMesh’s all-new Graph-based DHT library, which allows us to traverse any dMesh DHT almost effortlessly for the data our applications rely upon. While it’s quite amazing that we’re able to do this on a peer-to-peer basis, it’s also important that we validate those who are creating these sorts of entries on an application’s DHT or else we would never be able to trust the data being distributed across them. For example, I could create a dSocial post for the @jared user by simply creating an entry with…


Welcome to the all-new “Let Freedom Stream” series, where we’re rolling out dWeb 3.0, the world’s first blockchain-less and distributed web. We are very excited about the debut of dWeb 3.0 and we’ve been hard at work on its many components. As promised, to kick things off, we’re going to go through dWeb’s revolutionary Graph DHT that’s a part of the all-new dMesh framework I announced just days ago. dMesh’s all-new Graph DHT is allowing us to build multi-writer distributed databases that are truly efficient, in a way we simply can’t with blockchains. …

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The creators of the #dweb and the world’s first decentralized and censorship-resistant social network. We’re about to #DecentralizeEverything.

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